Struggling with remote teaching? We can help.

Struggling with remote teaching? We can help.

ONLINE PD ThaT Makes It Easy to Engage Students
From Homework to home learning

What is

From Homework to Home Learning?

With so much learning taking place in the home instead of the classroom, two distance-learning challenges we face are

1. How do we keep students motivated and engaged?

2. How do we promote active learning and deep thinking?

Addressing these challenges is the goal of our new online school-support initiative, From Homework to Home Learning.

Online PD that makes it easy to engage students

We’ll work with your team to integrate simple tools into your remote instruction. Teachers can use these tools immediately to boost motivation and build critical-thinking skills, including…

  • Reading for understanding
  • Supporting ideas with evidence
  • Mathematical problem solving
  • Applying new learning to the real world
  • Thinking creatively and divergently
  • Communicating ideas effectively

Be ready for the challenges schools face by building your customized From Homework to Home Learning plan today! Each session will focus on ready-to-use tools that increase student engagement, develop key skills and habits, and are easy to integrate into your current home learning designs.

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In this difficult time, teaching students how to use their minds well is a goal worth reaching for. If you would like to make this goal a focus of your home-learning plans, please reach out to us. We are helping schools across the country achieve this goal, and we can help you.

TOOLS Make It Easy to Improve Home Learning

One very big reason why we are able to help teachers make quick but powerful improvements to their home-learning designs is that we are the leader in instructional tools. TOOLS are ready-to-use techniques designed to make teaching easier and more effective. These TOOLS are collected in the award-winning series TOOLS for Today’s Educators.

Tools are ideal for improving the quality of home learning. They make it easy for teachers to get out of the “busy work trap” and instead design activities and lessons that invite real thinking and promote deep understanding.

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How TOOLS Address Common Home Learning Challenges

Let’s look at how sample tools address some of the most common challenges associated with home learning. We encourage you to download these free sample tools and use them to improve the quality of your students’ home-learning experience.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t self-directed enough to work on home learning tasks productively.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t self-directed enough to work on home learning tasks productively.

A tool to address the challenge:

Seven-Step Directions

This tool helps teachers write clear, easy-to-follow directions that enable students to work independently. Click here to see a set of Seven-Step Directions that a fifth-grade teacher created for a home-learning task.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t actively engaging with the content.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t actively engaging with the content.

A tool to address the challenge:

Window Notes

This zero-planning technique turns notemaking into an engaging and personal act of learning. It invites students to ask questions that raise their curiosity, look for interesting connections, and explore their personal feelings and reactions as they collect information. Click here to see a set of Window Notes that a third-grade student created during home learning.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t exploring big ideas or building “big-picture” understanding.

A common home-learning challenge: Students aren’t exploring big ideas or building “big-picture” understanding.

A tool to address the challenge:

Association Triangles

This technique takes five minutes of the teacher’s time to implement but creates real payoff in terms of student learning. It encourages students to explore big ideas—and challenges them to explain the connections between those ideas. Click here to see an Association Triangle that a high-school student created during home learning.

Interested in Learning More?